Asian Rolling Pin, Easy to Use

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Let’s talk about rolling pins.

If you’re struggling getting the dough rolled out to the right shape, this could be caused by two things:

  1. You need practice with a good technique.
  2. You’re using the wrong rolling pin.

Personally, I’ve never been very successful with those big fat rolling pins with the two handles on the sides.  And the French style, that’s a mystery to me (maybe I need to be French).  A straight, smooth, wooden rod (with a nice finish) works best, like the Asian Rolling Pin.  Here’s why:

  • A flat rod makes flat dough.  Makes sense, right?
  • It’s small enough, doesn’t gets in your way or obliterate the dough.
  • Used with a simple technique.

More on Technique. Here's the Trick:

  1. Lay out the dough and smoosh it flat.
  2. The rolling pin is centered with the dough.
  3. Palm of your hand on top of the rolling pin (or both hands).
  4. With moderate pressure, keep your hand flat and roll the dough.

This picture shows it perfectly.

These are what we use, because it’s easy.  Easy is important when we have 100 round Bao skins to roll out for the farmers market every weekend.

Tip: Bao Recipes and Dumpling Recipes by Choochoo-ca-Chew to perfect your rolling technique.

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